17 Days Video Series


Day 17 | Ling-Wen Tsai
December 20, 2007, 12:05 am
Filed under: 17 Days (vol.1)

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This video is from the ongoing collaborative video series entitled Water & Wind that I have been working on with the classical guitarist/composer Nathan Kolosko. Interdependency between the visual and the auditory is fundamental in allowing these two means of expression to transcend themselves and converge. The work focuses on capturing water and/or wind in various manifestations, and draws attention to invisible elemental energies that are perceptible through ever-present phenomena. Our goal is to create “timelessness” within a short duration and “boundlessness” within the confines of a fixed frame.

The media has over-stimulated our globalized culture with a massive volume of visual and audio stimuli that often lacks any meaningful content. With this project, musician/composer Nathan Kolosko and I are embracing the medium of video, and hope to bring a new depth to this genre. The intent is to present an essential amount of visual and audio, allowing time-space for the viewer to enter the experience and to ultimately become more engaged in their own existence within the fragile environment we share.

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Water & Wind: Window, 2007 – 3:49 mins

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Ling-Wen Tsai – Portland Maine

www.lingwentsai.com


3 Comments so far
Leave a comment

The videos “waterbug” and “bottle” i felt both have the best relationship with sounds and imagery, both of which were very soothing to experiance, something i could be mesmerized by for hours which works well to portray the timelessness effect Ling-wen Tsai wanted to give to the viewer.

Comment by nick gialanella

Probably the worst image to sound relationship ever. The image was semi- interesting alone, but the audio was a little too “slick”. I did like the whispering alone without the music though.

Comment by David

I’ve only seen Water & Wind: Window. The visual is intriguing at first, but I kept expecting more. I think the combination of the length and the voices made me analyze the visual details too much- I dug too deep. The use of negative space in the unmoving window worked well.

Comment by Chris




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